The Great American Getaway

The great American road trip is back. It’s returning with some 21st century style. The South Rim of the Grand Canyon is open, and so is the southern half of Yellowstone. Slowly but surely, places around are opening up and we’re emerging from our homes and ready to hit the road. You might still be wary of hopping on a plane or staying in a big city. We get that. That’s why the first step in our Great American Getaway is all about getting away from it all.

RVs

The mere mention of the term RV might conjure up images of Cousin Eddie emptying the septic tank in “Christmas Vacation,” but the RVs of today are well-furnished, clean and equipped with all the technology you need to make for a smooth family road trip. There’s a range of luxury RVs that accommodate varying budgets. Partners of ours such as Abercrombie & Kent and American Excursionist offer RV packages that fit your style. There are options for self-drive or with a driver, and you can spend every night on the RV and or retire to a nice lodge for the night while the driver takes care of the vehicle.

It’s easy to practice social distancing in an RV while carving out some quality family or couple time away from home. You don’t have to worry about constant unpacking and repacking, and you can be close to the outdoors action without having to worry about the lack of nearby accommodations. Of course, you can’t just park anywhere you want for the night. That’s where a well-crafted itinerary planned out with your travel advisor comes in.

Sensing “a nostalgic craving for the American road trip,” as U.S. operations manager Kirk Reynolds put it, A&K has developed local and regional itineraries of six to eight nights highlighting national parks, the Rockies and Texas to name a few. Excursionist also offers national parks itineraries in the West and from the Berkshires to Acadia. You can even get your kicks on Route 66 from Chicago to Santa Monica, or in Canada when the time comes.

Villas, Cabins & Condos

No matter what part of the country you live in, our partners offer freestanding structures for those not quite sure about jumping back into a high-rise hotel just yet. There are many options that are part of a resort and come with all the attendant amenities, such as Stone Water Cove on Table Rock Lake in the Ozarks, any number of places in Napa Valley or the Ocean House in Rhode Island.

For those who want even more space, Villas of Distinction is expanding its domestic collection to add more private homes in Colorado and Utah, Southern California (Palm Springs, La Jolla and L.A.). From Montana to Miami — and Singer Island and Orlando —they are adding or expanding their inventory. Hilton Head bookings are available immediately, and they’re also looking to add places in destinations such as Nashville, Charleston, Savannah and Martha’s Vineyard. Each home or condo comes with an updated guideline for cleanliness that owners must follow in addition to Villas of Distinctions already rigorous vetting process. They are also looking into modifying cancellation policies in the event of a COVID-19 resurgence.

Glamping

Nothing says back to nature like sleeping under the stars. Pitching a tent in the backyard and dragging out a couple of sleeping bags probably doesn’t cut it anymore after weeks stuck at home. With glamping, you can sleep in a cozy bed with a fire going in a semi-permanent tent complete with a private bathroom and shower. Instead of your back porch, you have the glory of a national park or another part of the great outdoors to explore with companies such as Excursionist and Under Canvas. There’s a kitchen serving up gourmet fare and S’more making around the campfire at night.

You can take private guided excursions during the day, including some awe-inspiring experiences such as lunch on the rim of the Grand Canyon after a morning of hiking, or riding a zipline through the canopy of the Great Smoky Mountains.

Whichever option you choose, let’s rediscover America this summer!

Top National Parks

They’ve been called “America’s best idea,” and it’s hard to argue given how much natural beauty the national parks preserve. There are 60 officially designated national parks across the United States and territories and the National Park System covers more than 84 million acres. With all that space, it’s hard to pick just a few parks to highlight, but you can’t go wrong with these favorites.

 

Yellowstone

It became a national park in 1872, 44 years before there even was a National Park Service, and it may very well be the first designated national park in the world. Covering more than 2 million acres in three states (Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho), Yellowstone features crowd favorites such as Old Faithful and the Grand Prismatic Spring. There’s also a thriving bison population, along with many other types of wildlife and a huge amount of geothermal activity. Plus, Grand Teton National Park is nearby and combines very well with Yellowstone in terms of trip planning.

 

Grand Canyon

A wondrous sight to behold, the Grand Canyon runs for 277 miles through Arizona, carved out by the Colorado River. While the North Rim closes for the winter, the South Rim is open year-round. The park provides an almost endless array of activities, from rafting to hiking to skydiving and even an ultramarathon. For those less inclined toward physical activity, there are helicopter and plane tours over the canyon. Camping out on either rim is also a popular option. The North Rim reopens May 15.

 

Great Smoky Mountains 

On the border between Tennessee and North Carolina, this park attracted more than 11 million visitors in 2017, nearly twice the amount of people who visited the runner-up, Grand Canyon National Park. With all kinds of fluctuations in elevation, Great Smoky Mountains National Park boasts a wide diversity of plant and animal life. There’s some type of flower in bloom basically year-round, and synchronous fireflies put on a natural light show around May and June. The 11-mile Cades Cove loop features historic buildings and a variety of wildlife and is the most popular area of the park.

 

Acadia

Featuring Cadillac Mountain, the tallest mountain on the East Coast and one of the first places in the U.S. to see the sunrise each morning, Acadia is the oldest designated national park east of the Mississippi River. Covering several islands off the coast of Maine, the park is an excellent destination for birdwatchers and rewards hikers with stunning ocean views. The area was first inhabited by the Wabanaki people and later became the site of the first French missionary colony in America. To reduce summertime traffic congestion, the National Park Service is working on a new transportation plan to keep the park a beautiful and enjoyable destination.

 

Denali

The highlight, of course, is the 20,310-foot-tall mountain which is the highest peak in North America and gives the park its name. But over more than 6 million acres, there is much to explore. Along the 92-mile road the traverses the park, visitors can see a diversity of wildlife, including caribou and several bear species. The topography features tundra, taiga forest, lakes, glaciers, and mountains. For adventurous spirits, dog-mushing and heli-skiing are popular activities.

 

There are another 55 national parks to explore, so contact us at info@dmctraveltailor.com to find yours and plan an adventure.